Food Technology

POTENTIAL OF GAMMA-IRRADIATION IN INCREASING THE PECTIN YIELD FROM MANGO (MANGIFERA INDICA) PEELS

The aim of this novel study is to find out if gamma-irradiation can increase the pectin yield of dried mango (carabao variety) peels once exposed to different doses as compared to non-irradiated mango peels. At the same time the utilization of mango peels as a source of pectin can harness the bioeconomy of this agricultural waste. The samples were prepared from four sets of ripe mango at 1 kilogram per set. Results showed that the dried mango peel of non-irradiated mango is 40 grams and 2 grams of pectin was extracted (5% yield). The next set was irradiated by 1 kGy (kiloGrey) and the 20 grams peel resulted to 2 grams of pectin (10% yield). When 25 grams of peel was exposed to 2 kGy, it gave 2.5 grams of pectin (10% yield). The highest weight of pectin was recorded when 25 grams of peel was exposed to 3.0 kGy that yielded 2.9 grams of pectin (11.6% yield). This study proved that exposing the mango to a certain dose of radiation, the pectin content of its dried peels can be significantly higher as compared to non-irradiated peels thus, can be an alternative to apple and citrus fruits as source of pectin. The result of this study has the potential to reduce and utilize such agricultural waste that can make mango exporting countries self-sufficient with respect to their pectin needs and can translate into significant dollar savings and create more jobs.

UTILIZATION OF BREADFRUIT (Altocalpus altilis) FLOUR INTO BAKED PRODUCTS

The overall objective of the study is to develop breadfruit (Altocalpus, altilis) as an additional source of flour in baked products. The matured and unripe breadfruits were washed in clean running water to remove latex and dirt. Then the fruits were peeled manually using a stainless kitchen knife. Peeled fruits are sliced into chips, weighed and blanched for 5 minutes then dried in hot air oven at 100oF for 5-6 hours. The dried chips were grounded using electric grinder. The product was used to bake a pie crust, cookies, and batter cake. Sensory evaluations were conducted as well as cost benefit analysis, with the breadfruit flour yielding favorable results for each. Comparisons with existing products were also done, with the breadfruit flour gaining a slightly higher adjectival rating than existing products. Overall, it is concluded that breadfruit ) is a good source of flour for baked products.

DEVELOPMENT OF VITAMIN A - RICH PASTA USING RICE BRAN FLOUR AS PARTIAL SUBSTITUTE TO WHEAT FLOUR

Micronutrient deficiencies or lack of nutritional vitamins and minerals, constitute a huge public health problem. Vitamin A deficiency increases vulnerability to a variety of illnesses which includes diarrhea, measles, and respiratory infections common amongst children. To address this, great interest in rice bran has led in the discovery of various health benefits. With this, the study aimed to develop a pasta using the rice bran as partial substitute to wheat flour and to determine the Vitamin A content of the rice bran pasta in comparison to commercially available pasta. The rice bran has undergone dry heating method at 130°C for 20 minutes and was formed into dough. The sample pasta was then analyzed for proximate analysis consisting of moisture content, ash, carbohydrates, protein, fat, and crude fiber. Vitamin A content analysis was also conducted. Moreover, aerobic plate count, yeast and mold count was observed for microbial activity. It was found out that the rice bran pasta is high in Vitamin A showing a high content of 188 µgRE/100g which is 47% of the recommended dietary allowance compared to the commercially available pasta. Researchers recommend developing a rice bran pasta that should be cut and shaped into different sizes, undergo further tests with different ratios of rice bran flour to determine its use as supplementary feedings in the community. From this study, it can be concluded that rice bran is safe for human consumption and can be used as a food supplement